An old sketch re-visited

It is interesting when old notes still resonate. Last week I was looking through several old sketchbooks and found a gesture drawing of my boys at play. I drew it a couple of summers ago, while they romped through the sprinklers. Today I worked on a refined sketch using the original as reference.  These images speak to me of childhood through the physical movements.

Sprinklers

Adriana Burgos, Study for “Sprinklers” based on a quick sketchbook drawing. Ink, watercolor, charcoal, sanguine and pastel

For today’s piece, I started out with ink and watercolor and then added layers of dry media with charcoal, sanguine and pastel to develop surface and emphasize shape and form.

sprinklers progress

Adriana Burgos, Study for sprinklers in progress ink wash and watercolor.

Using only a quick drawing as reference forced me to rely on memory, gesture structure and a familiarity with anatomy. Exploring the co-relation of gesture and memory to construct images is very beneficial for my artistic expression at the moment and I look forward to seeing where this process will take me.

More gesture drawings from karate

Here are four pages of quick gesture drawings done while I watched my boys’ karate class. While drawing these, the students were waiting for their turn to spar. I was focusing on capturing the various sitting poses and observing the movement of the spine, and the tilts of the skull, ribcage, pelvis and extremities in just seconds.

After completing these, I enjoyed the narratives that emerged from the children’s interactions. That is the great thing about sketching from life.

In this grouping there are graphite drawings as well as pen drawings. I find myself using fine pen more and more because I can rely on the point staying sharp when I am not interested in erasing. I have learned a lot from these studies, you can see some of the large drawings that have resulted from this practice by clicking the karate series sub menu under portfolio.

Studies of space and movement from multiple figures

Last week I posted a single quick gestural drawing from the karate journals. This week I am sharing a study of  multiple figures. I have found that the practice of quick gesture studies from life during my kids’ karate classes has given me the opportunity to explore composition and space. With no time to think, just look and record and this allows me to respond to the shapes and rhythms created by a room full of figures. I enjoy enhancing composition with light and dark and creating areas of emphasis by developing some figures more than others.

Single figure from the karate journals

Adriana Burgos, 1 minute gesture sketchbook drawing from the karate journals

Adriana Burgos 1 minute gesture sketchbook drawing from the karate journals

Today I share with you a single figure from my karate sketches. This is a gesture drawing done under one minute. The subject is a child in sparring gear, which includes, a helmet, gloves and shoes. I marvel at the balance and rhythms found in the human figure and never get tired of studying this through these observational sketches. In the torso, the spine has an “S” like movement; on the legs, the curvatures of the front of the thighs face the curves of the calves. All these lyrical movements add grace to the standing human form.

Movement studies

Here are a few of my sketchbook pages from the karate journals. My boys have been going to karate for four years now and I started drawing from direct observation as practice while watching the class. Working from figures in constant movement forces me to pay close attention and take note of the poses in seconds. Careful observation, memory, an understanding of anatomical structure and gesture all come into play here.  These studies allow me to explore composition in the picture plane as well as the human body in movement, thus enriching my visual vocabulary.